What We’ll Be

October 15, 2012 at 4:08 am

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The harder that you play, it seems, the more life demands of you. For that reason, What We’ll Be (WWB) keeps finding fascinations from strange hobbies every chance they’re caught digging their mitts into new proverbial cookie jars. Well, like my man Prince Vultan says, “who wants to live forever,” and to that we say ‘tis better to strike while the iron’s hot than to have missed an opportunity.

WWB is two restless gentlemen. One man: a drinker, a machine man, and the agitating line noise in an otherwise tranquil, meditative hymn. The other: a vegan, a carpenter, and a warm, mellow breeze in a cold, hard world. Respectively, they are Detroit native, technologist, and product of the third wave, Pipé Scuttleworth, and Chicagoan, Jeremiah Klinger, who stems musically from the early 90’s Chicago Punk scene. Pipé, a dj since the middle 90’s has produced as part of The Siege on both Blank Artists and We Are All Machines, his current label which he runs with his brother Drew Pompa. Jeremiah is an artist, designer, craftsman, musician and really a forever curious child poking his nose into all sorts of interests and disciplines. He is a member of the Brooklyn-based band, Gregor Samsa. He also creates under variations of the moniker, Ben and Alexander (the Champions). Their work in various art mediums, musical genres, and other disciplines over the course of several decades has resulted in WWB, a multi-faceted musical project without artistic or technical limit.

What started out as two gentlemen skulking away from group dinners down into Pipé’s studio, Six Demon Bag Studios, has morphed into an unstructured but fruitful endeavor. Despite apparent differences, the workspace, the work ethic, and the work product fall deeply into a graceful, serene focus when the creation bell tolls. Many times, hours can pass blissfully into the past with sounds reverberating, changing, and nimbly finding an eternal coziness within the confines of a composition. It is truly rare to find such opportunities for transcendence and we are eternally grateful that you’ve decided to join us on our journey.